Life at a Thai English camp, part 1

I previously spoke about English camps and my own experience with finding one of the higher paying camps in Bangkok.  Originally I was to work at a language center in downtown Bangkok but a few weeks later the director emailed me to let me know that the camp didn’t attract as many students as hoped for and so I was no longer needed.  However, the director put me in touch with a friend of his working at an international school who was looking for a camp teacher for 2 weeks.  So, I had a Skype interview with him and I was hired on the spot!  While the camp was going to pay less and be harder work, the upside would be that I’d get to work for a prestigious international school, getting free meals 3 times a day, working near Khao Yai National Park, and my own bungalow for the duration of the camp!  It was a no-brainer really.  Here’s what I got up for the first week of camp.

Day 1

Woke up early to make sure I got to the school early, managed to get to the school with time to spare but not before I was given an unplanned tour of northern Bangkok after my moto taxi got the directions wrong several times leading to me to worry I would be left behind!

After a scenic drive north to Khao Yai, I settled into my wonderful bungalow complete with kitchen, dining area, living area, bedroom, and AC.  Having settled in and eaten dinner, we went over to the teacher’s office and had a brief run down of expectations, followed by last but not least, ice breaker games to introduce the teachers and Thai TAs to each other.

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Standard bungalows for teachers

To finish off the day I had a beer together with some of the other teachers and generally got to know each other better.

Day 2

We started off the day with a good breakfast and then had a more thorough orientation to the camp which included a run through the ‘survival guide’, the allocation of classes, and a Q and A.

After lunch we met the parents briefly, basically just stated our name, our current teaching position, and how long we have been in Thailand.  From there we went back to the teacher’s office and planned our classes for the next day.

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Dividing the students into their classes, followed by name games

Dinner was served at 5pm to the students by myself and a group of other teachers as one of our camp duties.  We then went to the school gym where we were finally introduced to our students and played a game to get to know names.

Capping the day off a small group of us made the trek up the highway to a 711 and liquor store to buy snacks and a couple of beers.  For fun we then played a few games including ‘what are the odds’ and ‘mafia’.

Day 3

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Breakfast as usual, followed by class. 2 hours and 45 minutes later I had gained a good initial impression of my class, including their strengths, weakness, personalities, and the kind of activities they enjoyed most.

In the afternoon we had an hour and a half of games.  As part of group 1 I played the game ‘zip, zap, zoom’ for 20 minutes before having each group of students rotated.  After a short break we had a meeting about the upcoming ‘Next Top Model’ event on Friday and how we should prepare for it.  Should be a fun and interesting day for all!

To finish the day off we had another round of rotation games centered more around sports with classes competing for points to win prize.  While my Team Galapagos didn’t win, much fun and laugher was had by all!

That night we had a quiet night to charge the batteries for the next day.

Day 4

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My Galapagos students and TA

I had an early start to the day to quickly eat breakfast before the hungry hordes of students turned up to eat the food I’d be serving them; 3 meals a day, one day on, one day off rotating with another group of teachers

That morning my Galapagos class learned about habitats, types of animals, and features of animals.  This most revolved around playing scategories and learning the sentence structures e.g. Tigers are mammals and tigers live in the jungle.  After the break we had a more hands on lesson about senses with questions like ‘how does it feel’ and ‘how does it look?’ and answers ‘it feels __________’ and ‘it looks ________’.  To have a more interactive class, I took the students for a walk around the expansive school grounds giving the students the chance to find things that felt rough, smooth, soft, wet, dry, etc.  With time to spare, I let the students have some well earned time on the playground.

Next on the itinerary after lunch we had rotation games again.  This time the game I had was a little confusing so I adapted it to make it more suitable for my younger class, ages 7-10.  Thankfully the changes I made ensured most of the students thoroughly enjoyed the game.

While most teachers were able to go back to the bungalows for their afternoon break, myself and three other teachers had to go to Pak Chong to get a police check for the school.  This turned out to be surprisingly painless, we were in and out of there in under an hour, and even got to see the cells…complete with prisoners languishing inside them staring at us with intrigue.

After dinner the students had free time and number of activities to choose from including football, basketball, ping pong, and swimming.  I chose to play football with the students and had a great time.

With the next day being a day off, a few of the teachers settled in on my porch for some drinks, before it quickly turned into all 11 of us drinking beers and whisky after a long last few days.

Day 5

I literally slept on and off to 3pm in the afternoon before going over to one of the other teacher’s bungalows to watch UFC.  After that we had dinner, and then I went for a walk up the highway to 711 and returned to my room to start writing report cards due for next Monday.  Just the relaxing day and evening I needed before the next 7 hectic days kick off tomorrow!

Day 6

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Today was probably the best day so far!  We had survival themed classes where we made water traps by attaching bags to plants, sun dials with sticks, and even made compasses to put up on the wall to decorate the classroom.  After the break we talked about the things students should bring on an island to survive and why.  Even the problem child of the class was well behaved!

The rotation game we had today was also arguably the most enjoyable yet.  We played guns, bombs, and angels.  Students answered a question, chose a square on a grid and discovered whether they got a gun (to shoot the other teams, taking away one of their 7 lives), a bomb (which took away one of their own lives), and an angel (which gave their team an extra life).  The kids had loads of fun taking the other teams out of the game before being switched on to the next rotation.

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For the late afternoon activity I was placed on the Red Chilies Team for sports day.  For our team we needed to make a tie dye shirt.  I went for a more unorthodox style which didn’t turn out too bad!  Other than that, I went home, took a nap, had dinner, played football with the kids, and then retired back to my bungalow for a quiet night.

It was also a momentous day in Thai history today as the Thai king, the longest serving monarch in the world and widely considered the spiritual leader of Thailand, died at age 88.  How this will affect the rest of the camp and the daily life in Thailand remains unclear as the country embarks on a year long period of mourning.

Day 7

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Despite the previous day’s tragic event, the show must go on.  The day could be summarized in just three words: Next Top Model.  My job was to create badges, wings, feet, and a mask for all 17 of my kids in preparation for the main event in the evening.  It was stressful, getting the kids to behave and work together to make their costumes but we did it.  I have to give special thanks to my TAs who worked tirelessly to make my vision a reality.  When all the pieces were put together, the students were dressed as blue footed booby birds from Galapagos.

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The end result was a wonderful evening put together through the collective efforts of the teachers, TAs, and the students themselves.  Each class took turns to strut their stuff down the catwalk to the music students chose.  My class went with Sugar by Robin Schulz through our game of musical chairs at the beginning of the day.  The finale of the show concluded with teachers and a special student in special costumes strolling down the catwalk.  Needless to say everyone involved thoroughly enjoyed the evening.  There was even a Kanye West moment when Bill, one of my students, ran on stage to collect the prize for best finale student, won by another of my students, Joogim.  When all was said and done, I was very proud with the work everyone put in to make the evening a great success.

If you’ve enjoyed this post, check out part 2!

Vang Vieng: Lost in the Laotian jungle

Now If you read my previous article about my first foray into Laos you know it did not go well.  This time, my story is even more extreme and as is almost expected, a lot of extreme Laos stories begin in Vang Vieng while tubing down the Nam Song river.

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Goofy sunglasses and two awesome self-proclaimed piratz

I could easily start this post off with the tale of how I came to be lost in the Laotian jungle but I’m sure you have a rough idea judging from what you’ve read about Vang Vieng and what goes on there while tubing, even if it is genuinely not as wild as it was in years gone past.   In my case I wasn’t even sure if I was going to be able to go tubing because it was the rainy season when I went and this meant buckets of rain, high water levels, and a much stronger current.  On that day however the weather was gloriousFor the sake of it, my day went like this; wake up, eat breakfast, pre-drink with my French and Italian friends Louly and Fabio, get to the first bar, drink, second bar, drink more, third bar, drink even more, fourth bar, etc.  Also I went tubing between bars.  And then on the way to the next (last?) bar my night began.

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The sound of the rushing river and the buzz of mosquitoes filled my ears when it dawned on me: I was stranded in the Laotian mangroves with nothing but my tube, a broken lighter, a dead cell phone, not even a dollar of Laotian Kip, and no idea how far I was from the nearest settlement. But let me rewind the story a little to give you the full picture.

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Having got pretty drunk on the legendary Vang Vieng river bar circuit, or rather what is left of it, I climbed into my tube as the sun light began to die. I got separated from my friends Louly and Fabio because of the strong river currents and very quickly I was alone. The river was much faster because of the rainy season. As I called out my friend’s names and noticed that I was alone on the river and being sucked by the current off course. I began to get worried. Now, I don’t know if I was on the right course or not but it certainly felt like I was off course and although I could see lights down the river I made the decision to pull myself to shore and walk to the lights. This turned out to be the wrong decision but give me a break, I was drunk.

After paddling to the riverbank, several branches broke before I managed to find a strong vine and pull myself to shore. I was sitting on a sandbar in the mangroves and exhausted and no idea what to do. I looked up and saw a 6 or 7ft tall wall of mud and felt despondent at the idea of having to climb it and get my tube over it as well. With only some light left I did my best to get the fuck out of there.

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Somehow I managed to climb over the sandbank using vines and branches and began to claw and tear my way through the thick undergrowth. I came across what I figured were paths so I decided to stick to them. The paths were in places up to 2ft deep filled with mud and water. Eventually I tossed the tube because I figured I should care more about my own safety rather than trying to get a $12 deposit back, plus it was a bitch to carry while I tried to navigate the path. My sandals however I would have liked to keep, but still being drunk, they kept falling off and getting stuck in the mud, slowing me down and so they too were jettisoned. While I squelched through the mud barefoot I firmly banished from my mind the thought getting bitten by a snake, scorpion, spider, or any other critter.

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I don’t know how long I searched for the place I saw off in the distance while I was on the river but I had no luck finding it. In the dark the paths seemed to intertwine with the mangrove swamp and with a more bushy and thick grass kind of area. In the bushy area I would see what looked like a hill or a side of a road and as I kept moving through this area I realised there wasn’t a road nearby and my only point of reference was the river. It was at that point I thought I could hear music so I persisted in navigating through the grass and bushes even while I became covered in cuts and scratches from thorny bushes and branches. After some time either I had wandered too far away from the music to hear it or it had stopped, I felt it was time to double back the way I came the best I could and find a spot on the river to spend the night.

Initially I went back into the water to see if it was possible to swim across where I could see there was some kind of buildings but decided the river was simply far, far, too strong. Too tired to climb out I had half my body in the water to escape the mosquitoes and I attempted to sleep. Every so often I’d get the strange sensation that I was getting nibbled at by little fish or leeches and so I climbed out and tried to sleep. That was when it started to rain.

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I was only in a tank top and swimming shorts and so I began to shiver from the heavy rain. That was probably the darkest moment for me. I knew I was in the jungle at least until the next day and there was nothing I could do about it. I kept telling myself that I’d get out of this situation and I’d laugh about it over beers. While I told myself that, I knew I was in for a long night. I crouched in a ball with my arms covering my head from the worst of the mosquitoes and whatever else drank my blood that night. I knew that at first light I had to jump into action and follow the paths to where ever they went, no matter how far. Those trench-like paths were going to be key to escape my situation.

Gradually, slowly but surely, the sun began to rose. As soon as I knew for certain I’d be able to see where I was going, I bolted through the jungle, sloshing through the mud, getting more cuts and scratches, but determined to end my unintended jungle expedition.

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I followed one path right up to a single piece of barbed wire stretching across the jungle. Now for those who don’t know, as a legacy of the Vietnam War, Laos is the most bombed country in the world and is still littered with landmines. At that point I was not ready to cross the Rubicon so to speak and I turned around. Going back the way I came I went even further and this time found some hope to fuel my determination. I came across a small fishing shack, deserted, but a good sign. Past the shack I came across fences made from bamboo and plants with huge razor sharp thorns sticking out at me. Then I crossed a stream that had a piece of wood across it and finally I crossed another makeshift bridge to come discover I was in the middle of a rice paddy. With no one in sight I decided I would have to take the risk and go back the way I came to the barbed wire.

Back at the barbed wire I could see the path proceeded past it and further on into the jungle. I ducked underneath it and stuck to the path. At that point I came to another set of barbed wire, this time there were two. I stopped and decided I’d do some recon and check out the paths closer to the river between the barbed wire zone. At the river I gave up completely on the idea of swimming it and slowly approached the second set of barbed wires and climbed through them.

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By that point I was thinking of a number of worse case scenarios 1) I could be walking into a mine field 2) there could be booby traps set by whoever made the paths to keep trespassers like me out or 3) I would get to a field full of marijuana and be shot dead like the tourists in the movie The Beach. With the ad reline pumping I walked down the path and to my delight I saw a bunch of cows and chickens. Never had I been happier to see cows and chickens. Walking past them I could see some houses and then a woman. I cried out ‘hello’ and began waving at her as I walked towards her. She stopped and called out to other people. One by one people began to emerge from little houses, clearly a small farming hamlet. None of them spoke English and one man with a half scarred face seemed to size me up when he saw my waterproof pouch with my dead cracked smart phone in it. Eventually a boy came out, no older than 15 or 16 who could speak some English. He told me would take me back to Vang Vieng.

Getting back to Vang Vieng was not so simple. We walked towards the river and I could see that to get across the river we would be taking a pulley barge that went back and forth. It was me, the boy, a man, and a woman, possibly his parents or family members. Back on dry land I clambered up the rocky path barefoot when the boy told me to wait for him to go fetch a motorbike. Within a couple of minutes he was back and we were off again.

With the sun starting to really shine and the feeling that my ordeal was over a smile crossed my face. At the hostel I talked a little with the boy but sadly I forgot his name, spending a night in the jungle will do that to you when all you want is to be back in your room safe and sound in bed. Although he didn’t ask for money I knew it was the right thing to do. I went back to my room quickly and gave him 60,000 KIP, or about $10, and he thanked me and off he went.

In the room I put my phone on charge, miraculously it seemed to still work, mumbled a few words to my sleeping friend Louly, and collapsed into bed. When everyone else woke up a couple hours later one of the guys in the room says to me ‘so you’re Sean the guy I’ve heard so much about. I overheard a little of your story, what happened?’ I told him the story and he responded by saying that while some people go to Laos, I DID Laos, truly by having survived a night in the Laotian jungle.

I spent much of the day recuperating and relaxing and at night after I had told the story to a few people I could finally sit down with a beer and laugh about the whole thing. I had survived a night lost in the Laotian jungle.

Hope you enjoyed my epic tale.  I’ve read on other blogs that other people had similar stories to mine, are you one of them? How was your Vang Vieng tubing experience?